Opportunity, Responsibility & Empowerment.

Opportunity, Responsibility & Empowerment.

Anachronous History Forums AFRICA KMT (Egypt) Opportunity, Responsibility & Empowerment.

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  • #5987
    Beric
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    @beric_debenkah

    Unfortunately royal women had very little freedom, but for ordinary Egyptian women their fate was so much luckier, freedom not experienced by other male-orientated contemporary societies of the ancient world. Women could walk around the Nile Settlements without a male chaperon, such freedom was unusual and civilised also.

    Many of the large buildings had quarters for women, which was a welcomed privacy rather than confinement, Egyptian women held the same legal rights as men, they could own property, they could manage agricultural land to support their house, inherit property, bequeath their property, landed property was passed down from mother to daughter.

    Loan out their property and earn monthly interest, bring action against non-payment, bear witness to a legal document, be an equal partner in business and legal contracts.

    Reference used : http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk.                        – Charlotte Booth.

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    • #6082
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      Protecting Amulets :

      All Egyptians, whether royal or non-royal believed in the power of lucky amulets to protect and strengthen the wearer, living or deceased, many were buried with their protecting amulets for their journeys in the afterlife. The was quite a business in creating metallic amulets in ancient Egypt, to be worn by both sexes.

      The ancient jewellery makers made amulets, necklaces, bracelets, rings and pinned brooches or badges, representing Egyptian mythology as well as a persons favourite hieroglyph, the Ankh being the most popular brooch, beetle-like scarabs made in gold and silver came a close second.

      The gold, silver or bronze Eye of Horus adorned most robes as a pinned brooch as Horus’s right eye was always associated with the sun on glorious cloudless days of the Nile, the silver hedgehog had its place in Egyptian symbolism, representing fertility and the rebirth after hibernation.

      The gold, silver or bronze amulet of two joined fingers signified that the wearer had already thought ahead about their mummification, a badge of status perhaps, amulets of the human leg perhaps dangling from a necklace, part of the hieroglyphic writing symbolising good health.

      Gold & Silver frog amulets symbolising fecundity and the annual flooding of the Nile, the architectural symbolism of metallic set-square & plumb line, being presented by the Pharaoh, bestowed the wearer with eternal righteousness for their contributions to the Egyptian society. Finally the Golden Fly amulet, also presented by the Pharaoh, as a military honour and to protect the wearer from the annoying persistence of insects when on official duties.

      Reference used : Charlotte Booth.

    • #6016
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      Women’s Rights in Ancient Egypt :

      Women did not lose their legal rights after marriage, the could retain their legal status independently from their husband, while married a woman could retain all her properties, with the same freedom if she was single. When drawing up a will, a woman could distribute her property any way she wanted and had no legal obligation to leave anything to her children.

      A good example is Tay-Hetem 249BCE, who help her husband out of financial difficulties by loaning him 275 grams of silver from her personal store, to collect 30%  monthly interest and the debt to be repaid within 3 years.  30% interest was the standard Egyptian loan rate.

      As an Egyptian widow, she would be automatically entitled to 33% of her husband’s assets, the other 66% going to children or siblings, by making gifts to his wife in life, a husband could prevent distribution of his properties after his demise.

      Reference used : Elizabeth Thomas.

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