'Scealta Mhuir Eirenn' – Irish Sea Stories.

'Scealta Mhuir Eirenn' – Irish Sea Stories.

anachronous history forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Eire (Ireland) Mide 'Scealta Mhuir Eirenn' – Irish Sea Stories.

This topic contains 3 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Loegaire .

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  • #7029

    Loegaire
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    The Irish Sea :

    Or the Erse Sea in the Gaelic of the Scots, which separates the Islands of Eire & the British Isles, the Ulster-Scots referred to it as the Airish Sea and the Welsh as the Mor Iwerddon, linked to the Celtic Sea in the South by the Channel, and to the Inner Seas of the West Coast of Scotland.

    Anglesey (Ynys Mon) in Cymru is the largest island in the Irish Sea, the second is the Isle of Man, associated with the sea-god Manannan Mac Lyr, who rode a sea-going chariot across the seas of Ireland & the Atlantic, with his huge cloak trailing in the sea.

    The Irish Sea is connected to the North Atlantic at both its northern and southern points, and the Malin Sea. The southern point is linked to the Atlantic by the Channel between Ireland and Pembrokeshire, and the Celtic Sea.

    Reference : http://www.wikipedia.org

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  • #7202
    Loegaire
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    Cathracha Faoi Uisce : Submerged Cities :

    In the ancient days, before Columbus sailed to the West, Ireland stood out on the very uttermost edge of the known world, even in these ancient times there had been comings and goings to the British Isles, and to Europe and to places beyond.

    What with sailors, soldiers, merchants and sea captains, then there was missionaries, minstrels, pirates and pilgrims, all who had sailed across the narrow seas with tales of lands that lay East towards the rising sun.

    Even the far off Eastern Worlds of Bagdad, Hindustan & Cathay were not unknown in the traveller’s tales of Ireland, but as for venturing to the spiritual West, there was only tales of a endless ocean, and the folk who lived on the Atlantic coastline where full of wonder to what might lay beyond the watery horizon.

    Such a vacuum could not be tolerated, and the story-tellers’ imagination was not lacking in filling it with wonderful accounts of magical lands and of cities sunken under the waves, these tales were not entirely imaginary, hardy folk had sailed out into the Westerly sea and returned to tell the tale of their voyage.

    Hermits seeking spiritual solitude on the rocky islands between Sceilg Mhichil to Tory Island, leaving the evidence of their constructed cells and oratories, we know that the hardy sailors reached the Faroe Isles and Iceland, and the Gaelic-Norse were the first European settlers on Greenland.

    Also sailing to the North Fringes of the Americas, bringing back to Ireland the tales of whales, walruses, volcanos and smoky bays, large floating icebergs and gigantic sea serpents. All making Ireland not so remote.

    Reference : Kevin Danaher.

     

  • #7130
    Loegaire
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    The Treacherous Irish Sea :

    Thanks to modern technology and satellite navigation, the collision of sea-going vessels is now a rarity, but I salute the brave souls that ventured out into the open sea, with their prows ploughing through the salty brine with basic navigation instruments.

    Dedicated to the souls of the PS Nimrod, the Nimrod was an Irish passenger-carrying steamer, built in 1843, it transported passengers from Cork in South Ireland to the ports of Liverpool, England, it was the first leg for migrants wishing to start a new life in the United States.

    It operated, without incident, for 17 years, until in a storm it ran aground at St. David’s Head in 1860, it smashed against the rocks breaking into three pieces and sank, with a loss of 45 lives. The PS Nimrod was a paddle-steamer built by Vernon & Sons, a Liverpool shipyard, then purchased by the Cork Steamship Company in 1844.

    The Irish Patrol Vessel ‘Muirchu’.

    The Public Armed Ship Muirchu (The Hound Of The Sea), was a ship in the service of the Irish Free State’s Coastal & Marine Service, the Muirchu, was the former British Royal Navy ship HMS Helga and was involved in shelling Liberty Hall in Dublin from the River Liffey with her twin 12-pounder naval guns, in the days of the Easter Rising in 1916.

    The Helga was purchased by the Irish Free State in 1923 and renamed the Muirchu, she sank off the Wexford coast after its disposal of no longer being seaworthy, in 1947, the ship’s wheel was recovered from the wreck by local divers, and now is a central feature in Kehoes Pub in Kilmore Quay.

    I suppose the English expression of Liberty Hall, as a place where one may do as one likes, entered the sailors vocabulary.

    Reference : http://www.wikipedia.org

  • #7030
    Loegaire
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    Granuaile : Grace O’Malley :

    Grace O’Malley 1530-1603, Irish : Grainne Ni Mhaille, born in Umhaill, Connacht, Ireland, she was the first Lady of the O’Maille dynasty, in the West of Ireland, she was the daughter of Eoghan O’Maille, she was commonly known as Grainne Mhaol, which was anglicised as Granuaile, in Irish Folklore, Grace is a well-known historical figure in Ireland’s 16th century history.

    After her father’s death she took over active leadership of her father’s business trading on land and sea in the Province of Connacht, which brought her both wealth and influence, owning a 1,000 cattle and 500 horses.

    Grace’s half-brother Donal of the Pipes was taken captive by the governor of Connacht, an Englishman called Richard Bingham, Grace sailed to England to petition for Donal’s release, where she met Queen Elizabeth I at the Greenwich Palace.

    Their discussion was carried out in Latin, because Grace did not speak English and Elizabeth did not know a word of Irish, the final agreement beneficial to both parties was that Donal to be released, Bingham to be removed from Ireland and that the O’Maille would not support a rebellion against the Welsh House of Tudor.

    Grace’s mother was Maeve Ni Mhaille, of the same Clann as her father, when Grace was a child she went with her father to the Iberian Peninsula wishing to learn everything she could about sailing and sea-fearing activities, at first her father said no, he teased his daughter by saying her long brown hair would make the sailors think that she was a mermaid and the tresses of her hair might get entangled in the ship’s rigging.

    The following day she appeared in her father’s office with cropped hair shorter than any boys, after this on her personal maiden-voyage the sailors called her ‘Grainne Mhaol’ the bald-girl.

    Cathie Ryan’s lyrics for the folksong, sea-shanty for ‘Granuaile’.

    Now dressed in sailor’s clothes, Granuaile did go, A bold sea captain from head to toe, Her children and clan were her greatest care, Of Grace O’Malley who never did despair.

    Her trade was maintenance by land and sea, Two hundred loyal men were her army, No other captain was as skilled or brave, As Grace O’Malley who ruled the stormy wave.

    Reference. Wikipedia, Smithsonian & Cathie Ryan.

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anachronous history forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Eire (Ireland) Mide 'Scealta Mhuir Eirenn' – Irish Sea Stories.