Science Fiction In Books, The Cinema & Television.

Science Fiction In Books, The Cinema & Television.

List of RP’s Sci-Fi Multiverse Science Fiction In Books, The Cinema & Television.

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  • #7114
    Denarius
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    @denarius-cornellius

    Science Fiction In Books :

    I would love to say that I have read some of the Science Fiction Classics, but the would be a lie, when it comes to fictional book reading I have the attention-span of a goldfish, if the book doesn’t grab my attention by the first fifty pages, I find it too easy to put it down and forget about it, another dusty object on my book shelf.

    I tried to read Asimov’s Foundation and Arthur C. Clarke’s ‘Rendezvous With Rama’, but unfortunately found both books dry and tedious, I hope that doesn’t make me a literary Philistine, but I avidly read Kurt Vonnegut Jnr’s ‘Slaughterhouse Five’ & ‘The Sirens Of Titan’ along with Douglas Adams’s ‘Hitch Hiker’s Guide To The Galaxy’, I enjoyed them so much so, that I began to wonder if my interest in Science Fiction was semi-serious !

    I smiled with the ingenuity of such films as ‘Valerian’ & ‘The Fifth Element’ by Luc Besson, and certain science fiction series on television have caught my imagination such as ‘Farscape’ and ‘Westworld’, for dramatic appeal, but with this topic there’s much to discuss here, even the bad science fiction with the gem of a original idea, but falls between two stools in the writing and handling of the subject.

    I will need the assistance of Wikipedia and critics points-of-view to help me in my research to find out why, –  as a fan I can get mesmerised by an original science fiction idea or the clever retelling of a classic tale like Spielberg/Kurbrick’s reinvention of the Pinocchio story in ‘A.I.’ – (Artificial Intelligence).

    No Reference As Yet.

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    • #7116
      Denarius
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      @denarius-cornellius
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      Science Fiction & The Romeo & Juliet Premise :

      A premise that seems to be successful in both films and television serials.

      ‘Starman’. An alien takes the form of a young widow’s husband and asks her to drive him from Winconsin to Arizona, while the US Government tries to stop them, adding the much needed conflict to perhaps a wafer-thin science fiction story.

      ‘Bicentennial Man’. An android endeavours to become human and gradually acquires emotions on his journey, falling in love with the grand-daughter of his former sweetheart.

      ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’. An alien must pose as a human being to save his family and his dying home-world, but the attentions of a woman and the greed of other men create complications to his Earthly mission.

      ‘Passengers’. Jim’s on-board, mother-ship hibernation pod mysteriously malfunctions, waking Jim 90 years before the mother-ship’s final destination. Jim can not reset the hibernation pod or bear the isolation of being the only waken passenger. So he purposely activates Aurora’s hibernation pod blaming it on a malfunction, for the companionship he dearly needs.

      Which brings me to the mistake of finding Season 1 of Roswell, the TV series in the bargain basket, hoping it would resemble the ‘Project Blue Book’, TV series. Not realising at the time that the premise was taken from the young adult book, ‘Roswell High’, by Melinda Metz, the penny should have dropped when the young shop assistant said. ‘Your daughter will enjoy that’.

      Reference : http://www.wikipedia.org

    • #7115
      Denarius
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      @denarius-cornellius
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      Farscape :

      Yes, I struggled a little with the plausibility of the animatronic puppets of Rygel and the tortoise-like features of the Pilot, but was intrigued by the diversity of the crew of the bio-mechanical ship Moya, acting as a living identity rather than a big dumb object of a space-craft.

      John Crichton, an American astronaut who like Buck Rodgers, piloting an experimental space-craft at top speed accidently enters an inter-galactic worm-hole. Communicating, then landing Crichton’s craft inside an alien mother-ship, he befriends the stranded peace-keeper named Aeryn Sun, the only recognisable humanoid on-board the Moya.

      Despite Crichton’s best intentions, the out-spoken astronaut makes enemies, the primary of these is known as Scorpius, there are a few stand alone plots to introduce the other members of the crew, but the series in need of conflict of ideas, it appears that the peace-keepers wish to recapture the Moya.

      Crichton naturally searches for another worm-hole to take him back to Earth, and for protection reasons, reconstructing alien worm-hole technology weapons to defend his home planet.

      The secondary arc of the initial story-line was to explore ways in which the diversity of crew would be influenced by the science-fiction adventures together, finding the characters strengths and weaknesses for dramatic appeal.

      The most notable sub–plot was Crichton’s obsession with the premise of worm-hole technology, his bitter/sweet relationship with Aeryn Sun and the neural clone of Scorpius that now haunts his brain after an experiment that went wrong, thus giving Crichton the hidden depth of inner conflict.

      My plausibility was stretched when the bio-mechanical Moya gave birth to a child called Talyn, as they travel through space like a mother whale with her calf.

      But I enjoyed the Australian Series, although some of the characterisation of the Peace Keepers came straight from the science pulp fiction of the 1950’s

      Reference : http://www.wikipedie.org

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