The Ancient Picts.

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  • #5613

    Beric
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    @beric

    ‘Picts’, was the name given to a people who inhabited a large part of what is now known as Scotland, before the arrival of the Irish Scots. The Picts established themselves before and were later the contemporary race of the Scots, the Welsh Britons, then later the Anglo-Saxons.

    The Picts play an important role in the early history of the British Isles, they make their first appearance in the historical record at the end of the Third century AD. When the borderline raiding activities troubled the authorities of Roman Britain.

    After less than 600 years, they seem to vanish from the pages of history, leaving behind no written record of their own, nor any significant trace of their language.

    In the wake of their apparent disappearance, a fictional tale was created to explain it, and a shroud of myth enveloped the true story of their fall from power in ancient Alba.

    Reference used : Tim Clarkson.

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  • #5614
    Beric
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    @beric

    In The Sixth Century AD.

    The middle years of the first millennium AD saw Northern Britain emerging from the Roman era to enter a period commonly known as the Dark Ages. The name chosen by historians, is somewhat misleading, it conjures images of bleakness and gloom, after the civilised Romans, who kept records for prosperity, which appeal to historians.

    The ill-chosen expression of the Dark Ages also implying  a society that has reverted back to cultural ignorance and primitive ways of life, it is an image that is not only negative but also inaccurate, which means why many modern-day historians have abandoned using the term altogether.

    A more useful terminology draws on the period’s importance as the time when the Celtic & Germanic people of Europe first began to create their own documents and write their own histories, ironically dominated by Latin, but also documents in their mother’s tongue.

    In the British Isles this period can be loosely defined as the centuries between the withdrawal of the Romans and the invasion of the Normans.

    Reference used. Tim Clarkson.

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