The History Of Drinking Establishments.

The History Of Drinking Establishments.

Anachronous History Forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Eire (Ireland) Mide The History Of Drinking Establishments.

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  • #6799
    Beric
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    @beric_debenkah

    The Bar, also known as the Saloon, the Tavern, the Inn, the Public House or simple the Pub, all retail businesses that serve alcoholic beverages, such as various brewed ales, red and white wines, Gaelic liquors, cocktails, mineral waters and soft drinks, providing salted peanuts, salt and vinegar potato crisps and cheese and onion rolls to assist you in drinking more ale. The new trend is to offer a civilised restaurant menu, designating a space for tables and chairs.

    Many Public Houses operate a discount period, designated as the Tavern’s ‘Happy Hour’, to encourage off-peak-times for new patronage. There have been many different names for public drinking spaces throughout history, in the colonial era of the United States, taverns became important meeting places, discarding other institutions as a place of rendezvous.

    During the 19th century Saloons were a very important place for the leisure times of the hard-working citizens, the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages was prohibited in the first half of the 20th century in several countries as the upper classes Temperance Societies took hold, blaming the misery of the lower classes not on poverty but the consumption of alcohol.

    We know on the Prohibition in the United States, but it was also happening in Norway, Finland & Iceland, the Prohibition in the United States led to basement establishments called ‘speakeasies’, ‘blind pigs’ & ‘blind tigers’. Bar Owners & Managers chose the bar’s name the interior décor, the bar’s lighting or ambient lighting and many other elements which they hope will attract a certain kind of patron.

    A cocktail lounge is an upscale bar usually located in a hotel, and up-market restaurants and even in airport waiting lounges, a wine bar will attract a different type of customer than an ale-house, focusing on the worlds red and white wines, the norm being to serve small plates of very appetising food to compliment the wine.

    The more popular Ale-Houses focus on the beer, and real ale from micro-breweries, even serving refreshing craft-beer on tap, to survive the Ale-Houses now have a restaurant area and will compete with the Wine Bars by selling house wines.

    Reference used : http://www.wikipedia.org

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    • #6828
      Loegaire
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      @loegaire_buadach
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      I guess The Pewter Tap is a role-playing pub Beric ?

      Well, I’ve downed a few sherberts in some unusual establishments in my time, mind if I play along. Well the first place I would go is to The Green Man featured in The Wicker Man and sink a couple of strange brews with the likes of Christopher Lee, Ingrid Pitt & Britt Ekland before my life went up in smoke.

      Or I could go black and white in Powell & Pressburger’s ‘A Canterbury Tale’, and share a milk stout with Charles Hawtrey, or be like you as a dusty cowpoke, having a pint of froth with the likes of Matt Dillon & Doc Adams in ‘The Long Branch Saloon’, in TV Series ‘Gunsmoke’.

      Or share a glass of malt with Gary Oldman in ‘The Leaky Cauldron’ on the cobbled-street of Diagon Alley, leaving the under age Harry Potter outside with his pop, bag of crisps and a pickled egg. Or to be suddenly transported to Nepal & The Raven sharing a malt liquor with Karen Allen and the creepy Ronald Lacey, in ‘Raiders Of The Lost Ark’.

      Or to be transformed into 2 dimensions like Edwin Abbott’s ‘Flatland’ and the Futurama’s Hip Joint with Bender & Linda, or to suddenly appear in Pulp Fiction’s Jack Rabbit with Pumpkin & Honey Bun, and have a psycho-dramatic conversation with Quaid, in Total Recall’s ‘The Last Resort’.

      Finally to be seated in ‘Mrs. Brown’s Boys’ Foley’s Bar, sipping Guinness with Agnes Brown and the gorgeous Winnie McGoogan with the extremely beautiful Cathy Brown. Looking forward to Samhain and the opening of The Pewter Tap Inn, Beric !

      When Robert Zimmerman moved down from Duluth, Minnesota to Greenwich Village, Manhattan, Bob had two loves, Woody Guthrie and Matt Dillon  from the TV. Series ‘Gunsmoke’, chalked on the entertainments board was. ‘Playing Folk Music Tonight Bob Dillon’. At Gerde’s City Of Folk Club.   After Bob’s performance he was approached by Judy Collins who said. ‘You’re a wordsmith, you have more in common with Dylan Thomas then you’ve got with Matt Dillon’. The rest is history for both performers.

       

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    • #6802
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      The Fictitious Or Virtual Reality Bars & Pubs :

      Always a good community location for comedy, the angst of soap-operas and even the science fiction space operas like Star Trek’s Ten Forward & Red Dwarfs ‘The Aigburth Arms’, where, baby Lister was left in a box under the pool table. For example, ‘Cheers’ the location set,  in a bar in Boston, Massachusetts, with the crisp dialogue between Sam, Carla, Clifford, Norman, Frasier, Woody, Rebecca & Diane, I caught a few episodes and never reached for the remote, as it was amusing.

      Or to sit with an uneasy presence in ‘Goodfellas’, Bamboo Lounge, wearing a suit, polished shoes and a pink tie, with Robert de Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci & Paul Sorvino, when Joe Pesci asks you aggressively. ‘Why are you wearing a pink tie ?’   Or to sit comfortably dressed as a ruthless pirate in ‘The Admiral Benbow’s Tavern’, with Long John Silver, Billy Bones & Blind Pew, when Robert Newton bends forward and asks. ‘Why are you wearing a pink bandana ?’

      Or to wind the hands of the clock back to the mid-1950’s to be in ‘The Blue Boar Inn’, dressed in Medieval sackcloth and to be seated around a table with Richard Greene as Robin Hood, Archie Duncan as Little John and my childhood sweetheart Bernadette O’ Farrell as the prim and proper Maid Marian, then,  a North American grey squirrel runs across The Blue Boar floorboards. ‘The grey squirrel wasn’t introduce into the British Isles until the 1870’s!’ ‘It doesn’t matter, we’re filming in black and white, love’.

      Or to be in ‘The Boar’s Nest’, buying a drink for the leggy Daisy Duke, or, even ‘The Bronze’ with Buffy, or, perhaps, locked and loaded, in combat gear with a 5 o’ clock shadow in ‘The Brass Lantern’, with my only companion Dog-Meat, role-playing in the dystopia of ‘Fallout 3’ ! Surrounded by the post-apocalypse of Washington. D.C.

      Perhaps, being a stand-in extra for ‘The Lord Of The Rings’, in ‘The Prancing Pony’, standing at the bar with Frodo, Sam, Merry & Pippin, feeling six foot tall, or wearing platform soles from the 1980’s. Or to be dressed as a dusty cowpoke, barging into Gene Hackman’s ‘Greely’s’, behind Clint Eastwood & Morgan Freeman.

      Maybe in a quaint English Pub called ‘The Horse & Groom’, at Cottingham, drinking 3 pints of beer and eating 2 bags of peanuts with Ford Prefect & Arthur Dent, ale and nuts are essential ingredients for teleportation to an alien mother-ship before the destruction of Earth for a new inter-galactic worm-hole to be constructed by the reptilian humanoids Vogons. (What’s all the fuss about, its just a by-pass!)

      Reference used : wikipeadia & IMDB.com

       

       

    • #6801
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      The Pub Sign :

      In 1393AD, King Richard II of England, compelled by law, landlords to erect signs outside their ale-house premises, Richard’s legislation stated : ‘Whosoever shall brew ale in the town with the intention of selling it, must hang out a sign, otherwise the said publican shall forfeit their ale and any coinage to the Crown.’ This law was to make ale-houses easily visible to passing sign inspectors, the boroughs ale-tasters whose duty in was to decide the quality of the ale provided by the said ale-house.

      William Shakespeare’s father John was an inspector and ale-taster, another important factor was that in Medieval times a large proportion of the population would be illiterate, so the pub signs were more helpful than words, for this reason there was no need to write the establishment’s name on the exterior of building.

      Giving way to a paraphernalia of displayed articles associated with the art of brewing, such as the exterior painting of a bunch of hops or brewing implements was the sign painters preferred form of communication, in some case the local ale-house took on nicknames where the sign writer might paint a fox or a stag. Other names like The Star or The Sun became popular for the sign writer to paint.

      But then the landed gentry liked to put their mark on the community to get the sign writer to paint their family’s heraldic coat of arms, that incorporated Latin inscriptions, at time went by, other subjects appeared as literacy increased, the visual depiction of famous battles, notable local features, discoveries, sporting heroes & heroines, and individual members of the royal family.

      Because of King Richard’s degree the most popular name for an English pub became, ‘The King’s Head’, in this modern age there are more humorous and invented names for Public Houses, and more inventive names for the beer brewed in micro-breweries.

      Reference used : http://www.wikipedia.org

    • #6800
      Beric
      Forum Moderator
      @beric_debenkah
      Founding MemberPaying MemberHonorary Scribe
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      The Need For Entertainment To Create A Party Atmosphere :

      In the age of play lists and CD collection we all have our separate tastes in music, which is utilised in some Taverns, creating  tribal interest, such as a Blues Night, or the more serious Folk Night when more wine is consumed than ale, live music creates greater consumption and better profits, perhaps with a stand-up comedian working as master of ceremonies, but these establishments suffer the conflict of a restaurant area or space in which their clientele can dance.

      This is the period when the effect of beer goggles can be scientifically witnessed, the impaired vision when people appear more attractive, the saviour being the beer garden where you are still permitted to light up you pipe and reflect. The music doesn’t have to be live, but it helps, it might be professional DJ’s playing the music of your youth, that encourages you to hit the dance floor with the beer belly and weak ankles dance.

      The Celtic & Anglo-Saxon Waterholes.

      Drinking establishments are a prominent part of British, Irish, also to be found in Australian, South African, New Zealand & Breton cultures, in many places, especially in small towns and villages, the public house is the focal point of the community, in his 17th century diary Samuel Pepys described the public house as ‘the heart of England’.

      Pubs can be traced back to the Roman Taverns, but then again, they were wine bars with folk music, the Anglo-Saxon had a good taste for beer, their ale-houses developed into a tied-house system of Inns & Taverns. In 1393AD, King Richard II introduced legislation that all Inns & Taverns had to display a sign outside the public ale-house to make them visible for passing ale-tasters.

      Reference used : http://www.wikipedia.org

       

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