The Ship Burial At Sutton Hoo.

The Ship Burial At Sutton Hoo.

Anachronous History Forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Albion (England) East Anglia The Ship Burial At Sutton Hoo.

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  • #6497
    Beric
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    @beric_debenkah

    This one of the richest archaeological finds in England, a buried long boat in a burial mound with the treasures of a king who was probably one of the last pagan rulers of East Anglia, the unique king’s treasures are now on display at the British Museum.

    From the study of the burial ship itself, archaeologists understood more about the Germanic migration routes, the beautiful worked jewellery, with gem stones from far off counties, not usually associated with the Germanic tribes of this historical period.

    The high level of the Germanic artistic culture and precise craftsmanship of the jewellers, and from the royal insignia, the archaeologists and enthusiast alike can study the organisation of the Kingdom of the East Angles.

    Reference used : http://www.english-heritage. org. –  Charlie Green.

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    • #6550
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      The Western Saxon :

      In the rather emotive words of Daniel Defoe in 1703AD, who was rather political and prone to satyr more about the age he lived in than an historian, that being the reign of the Dutch Queen Anne & the Hanoverian King George I, wrote :

      ‘The Western Saxons who all the rest subdued, a bloody-thirsty tribe, barbarous and rude, who by tenure of the sword possessed, a westerly part of Britain, and by sword and shield subdued the rest, and as great things can dominate the small, their conquering part gave title to the whole, the Scots, Picts, Romano-Brits, the Roman veterans who were not recalled, and the Danes, submitted, and with the English-Kin Saxons all under tyranny unite.’

      In reality, the Angles, Saxons, Frisians, Danes and even the Normans, were little more than tribal names of folk closely-related genetic stock, of cognate speech, culture and spirituality. The Normans were French-speaking Nordic warriors, somewhat modified by mainland Europe, compared to their Germanic & Scandinavian cousins.

      Recent DNA as poured light upon those dark and anarchic days when, as we use conjecture, that small amounts of North Sea pirates and rebellious Germanic mercenaries achieved a measure of political power and perhaps a certain infusion of young blood in the deserted Roman province of Britain.

      Which became a part of English-Kin patriotism to prefer this un-attractive part of the declining Roman Empire, for a Germanic nation, the mixture of Anglo-Saxon and the Scandinavian who are a large proportion of the English nation, because of the literacy of the Angles, in their Germanic tongue as well as Latin, the settlers commonly called themselves English-Kin.

      For example King Alfred of Wessex, being a learned monarch, who could also speak in Latin and his Germanic tongue, when putting quill to parchment always used the expression ‘English-Kin’ and never ‘Saxon-Kin’ as all the war-lords recognised the literacy of the quickly and wide-spreading Angle-monasteries.

      Reference Used : Charlie Green.

    • #6498
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      Sutton Hoo :

      From the river Waveney to the river Stour, the coastline of Suffolk is broken up by several long estuaries, and perhaps the greenery of the valley of the river Deben on the Essex border is the most pleasant, near the mouth of the river, ten miles up-stream is the town of Woodbridge (Woden’s Bridge) and across the river Deben lies the small settlement of Sutton Hoo.

      Sutton is a very common name in Anglo-Saxon England meaning ‘southern town’, here at Hoo some 100 feet above sea-level are seventeen earth barrows, grassy mounds that concealed Bronze Age burials although the practice continued into the pagan times of the Germanic migrations, as prestigious ship burials.

      This barrow-group in known as ‘The Sutton Mounts’, but why weren’t these mounds excavated before the early part of the 20th century ? Because these lands were in private hands and used as a agricultural plantation. It wasn’t until 1938 that archaeological excavations were given the go-ahead to dig on the private estate, thanks to land-owner Edith Pretty expressing her curiosity about the possible contents of these prestigious mounds.

      With the permission of the Duke of Rutland, for Basil Brown to start the methodical excavation of the barrows, but it wasn’t until May 1939, that Basil Brown began work on Mound One, helped by Edith Pretty’s gardener Jack Jacobs, her gamekeeper Billy Spooner and the Duke of Rutland’s estate worker Bertie Fuller.

      They excavated their first trench into the grassy mound and on the third day of digging Basil got really excited about a mangy iron rivet which Basil assured his fellow workers was a ship’s rivet much to the bemused expressions of Jack, Billy and Bertie.

      Within hours of near careful excavation Basil unearthed the beginnings of the shape of a long-boat, by this time even Jack, Billy and Bertie were now getting impressed by the earthly remains of a ship’s hull, as they gradually reached and uncovered the burial chamber.

      Basil telephoned Cambridge University and talked excitedly to Charles Phillips, the following day Charles Phillips and Ipswich Museum curator George Maynard were staggered to see what these amateurs had uncovered, this led to frantic telephone calls to the British Museum, the Science Museum and the Office of Works as the news began to spread in official circles.

      Initially Charles Phillips under the guidance of the British Museum instructed Basil Brown to cease his excavation until they could get a team of professionals together, but Basil expressed his concern that the knowledge had become local and there was a possibility of looting treasure hunters.

      Charles Phillips agreed and got together a team of friends from academic archaeological circles William Grimes & Oscar Crawford from the Ordnance Survey, Peggy and Stuart Piggott, his friends from Cambridge University, also the British Museum sent their female photographers,  Mercie Lack & Barbara Wagstaff to take extensive photographs of all the different stages of the excavation.

      Of the treasure uncovered was a ceremonial whetstone with ornate human figures, a roughly moulded bronze stag with impressive antlers, the panels of an ornate battle-helmet fit for a king, this helmet with its ornate face guard has be replicated many times since the 1940’s to iconic status.

      The ornate boss and zoomorphic gold imagery that would have appeared on the King’s shield, runic inscribed silver spoons, a Coptic bowl, perhaps from Ethiopia, an ornate purse with almost Celtic zoomorphic designs, now reconstructed as a replica, a bejewelled gold scabbard with baldric mounts, two large drinking-horns with silver gilt mounts, various bejewelled gold buckle and strap-ends.

      A bejewelled gold shoulder clasp, Byzantine ornately designed silver bowls, the copper and silver parts of a minstrel’s lyre, now reconstructed, and finally a Bronze Age Celtic feasting bowl,  used for drinking mead and toasting Woden.

      Reference used : Rupert Bruce-Mitford.

       

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