The Supernatural World Of The Anglo-Saxons.

The Supernatural World Of The Anglo-Saxons.

anachronous history forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Albion (England) The Supernatural World Of The Anglo-Saxons.

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  • #6282

    Beric
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    Their gods and goddesses and their pagan roots.

    The term ‘Anglo-Saxon’ is a modern historian category to describe the Germanic settlers of Britain, from the mid 5th century, to their creation of the modern English nation, to the Norman conquest of 1066AD. The Germanic tribes, including Jutes, Angles, Saxons, Frisians, Franks of North Gaul, pre-Viking Geats, the Dutch lowlanders and many other Germanic-speaking clans.

    All who came to Britain from what is today Denmark, pre-Viking Scandinavia, Holland, North Germany &, Northern Gaul, the Anglo-Saxons were the dominant force because of their literacy in both Latin and their mother-tongue, however, it was the Angles who gave their name to the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, because of the generally accepted expression of ‘English-Kin’, that all the Germanic settlers favoured.

    Reference used : http://www.english-heritage. co.uk.      – Susannah Swafflington.

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  • #6366
    Beric
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    Woden : The Lord Of Magic :

    Woden is remembered in England today as the god who gave his name to the English day-of-the-week, Wednesday – Woden’s Day, it is important to remember that Woden was married to Frige, the goddess of peace, although Woden was regarded the god of war, from the Anglo-Saxon point-of-view this was the perfect balance of their deities and their daily lives.

    More importantly, Woden was the god of knowledge and wisdom, Woden with thought and memory sought out knowledge on a daily basis, and he would never destroy or burn knowledge because it was such an important factor to peace and war, this led to the Anglo-Saxon literacy and the Germanic records that historians hold so dearly.

    Thunor – Thor, the Germanic god of thunder and lightning, Thunor was also worshipped in fledgling England by the ‘English-Kin’, the name Thunor coming from the Old Frisian language, not much of Thunor’s cult survives in modern-day England, but the deity gave his name to ‘Thursday’ – Thunor’s Day, only two place-names remain in honour of the god of thunder, Thunor’s Pillar & Thunor’s Sacred Tree, used as a political meeting-place, referred to as the Gar-Tree.

    Reference used : Anton Uddavitch.

  • #6365
    Beric
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    Grimm :

    Woden by another name, the old Germanic expression of Grimm just translates as ‘fury’, but when pagan England became Christian England the word ‘grim’, took on an entirely different meaning by distancing the name from its original meaning, to be grim is to be unpleasant, forbidding and ghastly, however, scattered across England are place-names of worship dedicated to Grimm.

    Grimes Graves, Norfolk – A Neolithic chalk and flint mine named after Grimm, Grimsbury, Oxfordshire – Grimm’s Stronghold. Grimsbury Castle, Berkshire – An Iron Age prestige mound renamed in honour of Grimm. Grimsby, Lincolnshire, the Anglo-Saxon place-name accepted by the new Viking settlers because of the Norse warriors respect for Grimmr.

    Grimscote, Northamptonshire – Grimm’s Cot, the Saxon name of ‘cot’, meaning both a farmstead cottage and a shelter for grazing sheep, or just the winter shelter of all Saxon domestic livestock. Grimsthorpe, Lincolnshire – A village blessed by Grimm and perhaps another twenty examples.

    Reference used : Susannah Skefflington.

     

  • #6299
    Beric
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    English Place Names & Woden :

    There can be no doubt that Woden was worshipped in Anglo-Saxon England, as his name is still etched upon the English landscape, the great Anglo-Saxon Kings & Queens claimed to be direct descendants of Woden, listing him as a divine ancestor in their genealogies including the Kingdoms of Wessex, Kent, East Anglia & Mercia.

    The following is a list of place-names associated with Woden in England : Wambrook. Somerset – Woden’s Brook, Wampool, Hampshire – Woden’s Pool, Wamborough, Wiltshire – Woden’s Barrow, Wansdyke, Woden’s Dyke, (dyke in this context being a moat or a ditch) Wanstead, Essex – Woden’s Stead or Farmland, and Wednesbury,  West Midlands – Woden’s Burgh or Stronghold.

    Also Wednesfield, Wolverhampton in the West Midlands – Woden’s Field or Veld, Wednesham, Cheshire – Woden’s Hamlet, Wensley, Derbyshire – Woden’s Meadow, Wembury, Devon – Woden’s Hill, and finally Woodbridge, Suffolk – Woden’s Bridge, although they are another fifty examples of the worship of Woden in the English countryside, to be named after Woden meant a blessing and good fortune.

    Reference used : Susannah Skefflington.

  • #6298
    Beric
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    The Anglo-Saxon Woden :

    Both the wolf and the raven were sacred animals to Woden in the Anglo-Saxon mythology, Geri & Freki, (the ravenous & the greedy) signified the earthly aspects of Woden, hence the sacrificial wolf-pits, the ravenous and the greedy always accompanied Woden, the spiritual aspects of Woden were personified in the ravens Huginn & Muninn, the spiritual flights of thought and memory.

    There is a small reference to Woden’s wolves and ravens in the ancient poem of ‘Beowulf’ :  ‘ The harp will not wake the sleeping warriors, but the raven winging darkly over the doomed will have news, tidings for the eagles of how they hooked and ate, and how the wolf made short work of the dead’.

    Ravens and various carnivorous birds were seen on the aftermath of bloody battles and skirmishes, these birds became associated with wolf packs, death and the war-god Woden, hence the expression leave them to the wolves, seeing a raven or even an owl could be either a good or bad thing for an Anglo-Saxon, because of the folkloric belief that Woden could see through their eyes.

    Reference used : Susannah Skefflington.

  • #6283
    Beric
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    The Divine Right To Rule :                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         From the Saxon lands, the district of settlement became known by the literate Angles as ‘Old Saxony’, the settlement of the East Saxons, (Essex), the south Saxons (Sussex) and the West Saxons (Wessex), besides this, from the land of the Angles, the land between the kingdoms of the Jutes and the Saxons of Demark who called themselves the Angeln, basically making cousins of them all.

    From the Angeln came the kingdoms of East Anglia, the Mercians, and all the Northumbrian Germanic races of the Jutland Peninsula, all Angeln neighbours, although conflicts developed between the Angles for an Over-King, in search of a national identity that brought the Saxons to the battlefield who had already ousted the Romano-Brits and pressured the Romans and their collapsing Empire. Or the old pagan belief that my gods & goddesses are bigger than your gods & goddesses, therefore I have the divine right to rule, which indirectly pathed the way for Rome & Christianity. Beware of spiritual Earth-bound kings.

    Referenced used : Susannah Swafflington.

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anachronous history forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Albion (England) The Supernatural World Of The Anglo-Saxons.