Wulffingas : The Children Of Beowulf.

Wulffingas : The Children Of Beowulf.

Anachronous History Forums EUROPE THE WESTERN ISLES Albion (England) East Anglia Wulffingas : The Children Of Beowulf.

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  • #6148
    Beric
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    @beric_debenkah

    The Wulffingas, of Gotaland & Blythburgh, Suffolk, The Kings Of The Eastern Angles.

    The Geat Nobility of Gotaland, a Swedish trading-centre where great riches passed hands, Gotaland in modern-day Sweden, Gotaland because of the islands location great trading wealth came from East & West European mainland, the name of the tribal islanders of Geat lives on to this day in (East) Vastergotland & (West) Osterland, the archaeological rich area of the Swedish provinces.

    The word ‘Geat’, in etymology terms means, ‘those-who-pour-seeds’, the Geats were also mentioned in the ancient manuscript of ‘Beowulf’ as the Sea-Geats with their neighbours, ‘The Wederas’. The population of Gotland was created by the migration of Goths from mainland Sweden and the mythological siblings of Pjalfi (male) & his sister Roskva. @beric

    Reference used : http://www.historic.co.uk.

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    • #6499
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      Wuffinga Or Wulffinga ?

      The two warriors of Geat who established The House Of Wuffinga were Wehha, and his son Wuffa, Wuffa perhaps being a nickname for Bark-Speech, but then again, with the Geats love of Woden & his wolf packs, is there a possibility that Wuffa, should really be Wulfa, Wulfa being a popular name in Anglo-Saxon England, just look at some of the original place-names of Anglo-Saxon England & their worship of Woden the Grimm.

      The Settlement Of Wulfa’s Run that became the City of Wolverhampton, their nickname for their football (soccer team) The Wolves , Wolf-Ditch, a stream frequented by wolves, Wolves Ford, Wulf’s Leah, Wulf-Hala, Wulfa’s Tun, Wulfsig’s Hala, Running Wolves, Wulfgar’s Cot, Wulfa the Weard, Wulfhere’s Homestead, The Wolf Pack, Wulfa’s Bedding, Wulf-Frip’s Tun, Wulfrid’s Worth, Wolfen Wood. Wolf Lake, Wulf-Veld, and finally Wolf-Pit, that got ploughed up through agriculture and the local inhabitants renamed it Woolpit with their new Christian attitudes.

      Then Christianity took over The House Of Wulffinga, with King Onna’s saintly daughters, who perhaps prefered the dynastic name of Wuffinga, and renaming the Hall of Wolves to be the Hall of Blithe, as it was singularly recorded, the old English word ‘blithe’, cheerful, merry and joyful, filled with blitheness and beauty, so the Suffolk river that washes into the North Sea became the river Blyth, and Onna’s palace and fortress became The Burgh Of The Blythe ! Onna’s daughters Sexburh, Ethelberg & Athelthryth who, rather than marriage,  all entered convents and received sacred orders.

      Burgh, a common name in Anglo-Saxon England, in Old English ‘burg’, denoting a fort, the remains of Roman fortifications, the nobilities thatched long house, a barracks, and a fortified manor house where taxes were collected.

      Reference used : Professor Green & Tom Dicken.

    • #6168
      Beric
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      @beric_debenkah
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      Doctor Sam Newton : The Origins Of Beowulf :

      Where did the unique Old English epic of Beowulf come from ? In whose long-hall did the poem makers first tell the dramatic tale ? Dr. Newton’s detailed and passionate arguments offers the real and exciting possibility that he has discovered the lost origins of the poem in the pre-Viking kingdom of eighth century East Anglia.

      The fortunes of three sixth-century Northern dynasties feature prominently in Beowulf. Taking as a probable reflection of the genealogical traditions of a pre-Viking Anglo-Saxon aristocracy claiming descent from one or more of these dynasties, Dr. Newton suggest that references in the poem to various heroes whose names are listed in the Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies indicate that such Northern dynastic concerns are most likely to have been fostered in the Kingdom of East Anglia.

      He supports his argument with evidence drawn from East Anglia archaeology, hagiography and folklore, bringing life to a vanished age. Doctor Sam Newton graduated with a first in English literature from University of East Anglia in 1983, where he was awarded a Ph.D for his work on Beowulf in 1991. Sam is currently a tutor in Continuing Education.

      Reference used : Boydell & Brewer.

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